Journal of Conservative Dentistry
Home About us Editorial Board Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Login 
Users Online: 717
Print this page  Email this page Bookmark this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 


 
ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 5-13
Effect of cyclical lateral forces on microleakage of cervical resin composite restorations


Department of Conservative Dentistry, Goa Dental College & Hospital, Bambolim, Goa 403202, India

Click here for correspondence address and email
 

   Abstract 

The purpose of this in-vitro study was to compare the amount of microleakage occurring in cervical restorations in groups of extracted teeth restored with four different types of resin composite materials, representing four basic categories widely used by restorative dentists today. This comparison was made, both with and without the application of cyclic lateral forces. A testing instrument developed specifically to reproduce cyclic lateral forces was utilized. The amount of microleakage that occurred was compared, both with and without the application of the forces. Within the limitations of the study, we found that the packable and the hybrid resin composite material exhibited significantly more leakage than either the flowable or the microfilled resin composite. This was observed in both the fatigued and the non-fatigued specimens. This finding supported the theory that the lower modulus of elasticity of flowable and microfilled resin composites allows more flexure of the restoration during the flexure of the tooth, that results from its reciprocal movements. The non-fatigued specimens restored with flowable and microfilled resin composite material had less microleakage than did those restored with the hybrid resin composite material. The findings in the study supported the possibility that lower modulus of elasticity of the microfilled and flowable resin composite materials may have some beneficial effects in reducing the stress placed on the adhesive bond at the resin tooth interface during the polymerization phase.

Keywords: Microleakage, microfilled resin composites, flowable resin composites, packable resin composite, hybrid resin composites

How to cite this article:
Alberto RF, de Ataide Id. Effect of cyclical lateral forces on microleakage of cervical resin composite restorations. J Conserv Dent 2007;10:5-13

How to cite this URL:
Alberto RF, de Ataide Id. Effect of cyclical lateral forces on microleakage of cervical resin composite restorations. J Conserv Dent [serial online] 2007 [cited 2019 Jul 21];10:5-13. Available from: http://www.jcd.org.in/text.asp?2007/10/1/5/42274

   Introduction Top


Microleakage is defined as 'the clinically undetectable passage of bacteria and bacterial products, fluid molecules or ions from the oral environment along the various gaps present in the cavity restoration interface'. It has been established that a minimum of 1.0 pin space is definitely left at the tooth restoration interface even after employing the adhesive liners and bases [1] .

Many suggestions have been made as to factors that may be manipulated to reduce the occurrence of microleakage around the cavosurface margins of cervical resin composite restorations. Some studies suggest that an important factor in the occurrence of microleakage is the amount of stress created during the polymerization shrinkage of the resin composite material [2],[3],[4] . Suggestions for how this polymerization stress may be reduced include: alterations in the type, application and intensity of the curing light [4],[5] ;the incremental layering of the resin during insertion [6],[7] ; and the manipulation of the physical or chemical make up of the restorative material to alter the ability of the material to withstand plastic deformation during polymerization [8],[9] .

Other studies point to stresses created by actual flexure of the tooth during natural function as a factor facilitating microleakage [10],[11] . Some have suggested the utilization of a more flexible restorative material to help absorb the stresses caused by this tooth flexure thus reducing microleakage in cervical restorations. Lee & Eakle [13] in 1984 were the first to suggest that lateral occlusal forces on teeth could be a causative factor in the development of non-carious cervical lesions.

A photo elastic study by Kuroe et al [15] in 2000 found that an unrestored cervical lesion concentrated the stress of occlusal forces at the apex of the notch type lesion. The same study indicated that the stresses at the apex of the notch are reduced following the restoration of the lesion but a new concentration of force then develops, in the area of the occlusal and gingival margins of the restorations. These stresses can have an effect on the interface between the tooth and a restoration placed in the cervical region. The constant exertion of compressive and tensile stresses on the tooth restoration interface may lead to an increase in the amount of microleakage because of deterioration of marginal integrity or the actual dislodgement of the restorative material [9],[10] .

When a bonded restoration is placed in the cervical area, it is critical that the materials used to restore the defect possess physical properties that can withstand the stresses created by tooth flexure. Studies in the past have suggested that restorative materials with a low Young's modulus of elasticity are more flexible. These materials with a low Young's modulus of elasticity are able to absorb some stresses induced by the tooth flexure, thereby decreasing the amount of microleakage or debonding that may be created by heavy lateral forces from occlusal interferences [16],[17],[18] .


   Materials and Methods Top


Eighty human maxillary premolars, free of caries were selected for the study. The teeth selected were of patients in the age group of 12 to 18 years who underwent extraction for their orthodontic treatment. The extracted teeth were stored in 10% Formalin for a period of one month before they were used in this study.

Mounting and Preparation of the specimen:

Notch shaped preparations were made in the buccal surface of each tooth using an air rotor hand piece with coarse grit, flame shaped diamond abrasive point. The occlusal cavosurface margin was prepared in enamel and the gingival cavosurface margin was prepared 1.0 mm apical to the cemento­enamel junction. The occluso-gingival height of the preparation was 3.0 mm and the axial depth was 1.5 mm at the deepest point of the wedge-shaped preparation.

The roots of the selected teeth were notched horizontally with a carbide bur. Each tooth was oriented so that the long axis of the tooth was parallel to the tabletop and placed into a Poly Vinyl Chloride ring. Auto polymerizing resin was then used to anchor it in place. The acrylic resin surrounded the root up to a level 1.0 mm below the gingival cavosurface margin of the resin- composite restoration. The specimens were allowed to set in water at 24°C for 24 hours.

Restoration

Following the completion of the cervical preparation, the 80 teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 20 each in number. Each of these groups received a different restorative material. The four types of resin composites were 3M Filtek P60 (Packable), 3M Filtek Z250 (Hybrid), 3M ESPE Filtek Flow (Flowable) and 3M Filtek A110 (Microfilled). Each of these materials was used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

The prepared cavities were etched with 3M Scotchbond Etching Gel (3M ESPE) containing 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds and then rinsed for 10 seconds. Using a fully saturated brush tip, a coat of 3M Single Bond Adhesive system (3M ESPE) was applied to the etched enamel and dentin. After gently drying for 2-5 seconds it was light cured for 10 seconds. A second coat of the adhesive was applied and light cured immediately for another 10 seconds. The resin composites were placed into the preparations in three increments. Each increment was thoroughly light cured prior to placement of the next increment. Curing time for each material was as per the recommendations of the manufacture. Excess restorative material was removed using finishing burs. The restorations were then polished with Sof-Lex abrasive disks (3M ESPE).

GroupA:

The wedge-shaped defects were restored with 3M Filtek P60, which is a visible, light activated, radiopaque, restorative composite resin designed to be used in posterior restorations. The filler in Filtek P60 is zirconia/silica. The inorganic filler loading is 61% by volume. The inorganic filler loading is 61% by volume (without silane treatment) with a particle size of 0.19 to 3.3 microns. It contains BIS-GMA, UDMA and BIS-EMA resins. The modulus of elasticity is 11 GPa(Giga Pascals)

Group B:

The wedge shaped defects were restored with 3M Filtek Z250, which is a visible, light activated, radiopaque, restorative composite designed to be used in both anterior and posterior restorations. The filler in Filtek Z250 is zirconia/silica. The inorganic filler loading is 60% by volume (without silane treatment) with a particle size of 0.Olto 3.5 microns. It contains BIS-GMA, UDMAand BIS-EMAresins. The modulus of elasticity is 11000 MPa.

Group C:

The wedge shaped defects were restored with 3M ESPE Filtek Flow restorative, which is a low viscosity, visible light activated, radiopaque flowable composite resin. The filler in Filtek Flow restorative is zirconia/silica. The inorganic filler loading is 47% by volume with a particle size of 0.01 to 6 microns. The average particle size for the filler is 1.5 microns. It contains Bis-GMA, and TEGDMA resins. The modulus of elasticity is 6500 MPa.

Group D:

The wedge shaped defects were restored with 3M Filtek A110 anterior restorative, which is a visible­light activated, microfilled restorative designed for use in non-stress bearing restorations where esthetics are of prime concern. Restorative material contains 40% colloidal silica by volume with an average particle size of 0.04 microns (the particle size range is 0.01-0.09 microns). The resin system consists of BIS-GMA and TEGDMA. The modulus of elasticity is 5700 MPa.

Cyclic Fatigue testing:

Each group of 20 teeth was then divided into groups of ten each. Ten of each group were not subjected to cyclic fatigue stresses (non fatigued control specimens and the other 10 were subjected to fatigue stresses (fatigued specimens).

The Cyclic Loading Apparatus was designed like the one suggested by Fruits et al (2002)26. The tooth specimen was mounted so that the force from the bumper was applied to the occlusal half of the clinical crown. With the specimen in a fixed position the drums rotated and contacted either the buccal or lingual surface of the specimen thus cyclically loading the specimen in the buccal and lingual directions. The specimen recovered under no load and was then loaded from the opposite direction. The disc rotated at 35 rpm and allowed a recovery time of 0.28 seconds between each impact. Each specimen was subjected approximately 8,400 cycles and then removed.

The tooth specimen was mounted so that the force from the bumper was applied to the occlusal half of the clinical crown. With the specimen in a fixed position the drums rotated and contacted either the buccal or lingual surface of the specimen thus cyclically loading the specimen in the buccal and lingual directions. The specimen recovered under no load and was then loaded from the opposite direction. The disc rotated at 35 rpm and allowed a recovery time of 0.28 seconds between each impact. Each specimen was subjected approximately 8,400 cycles and then removed.

Both, the 10 non-fatigued and the 10 fatigued specimens of each group were then stained and microscopically examined. Prior to staining, the surfaces of all teeth in each group were stained with finger nail polish to prevent extraneous leakage of the dye into the tooth structure. The juncture of the acrylic resin and the root surface was also sealed to prevent leakage between the acrylic resin and the tooth. All specimens were stored in 0.5 % Basic Fuchsin dye for 24 hours at 24°C. The specimens were then stored in water at 24°C until sectioning was accomplished. Each specimen was sagittally sectioned with diamond-bladed circular saw mounted on a micromotor handpiece.


   Examination Top


The sectioned halves were examined under 4x magnification with a stereomicroscope for leakage of the dye between the resin-tooth interface. The degree of marginal leakage was evaluated with the use of the following rating criteria, adapted from a system used by Willer et al [18] .

0 = no evidence of penetration at the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

1 = penetration less than or equal to one sixth of the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

2 = penetration less than or equal to one third of the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

3 = penetration less than or equal to one half of the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

4 = penetration less than or equal to two thirds of the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

5 = penetration less than or equal to five sixths of the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

6 = penetration less than or equal to the entire interface of the restoration and the tooth.


   Discussions Top


Microleakage - the passage of bacteria, fluids, chemical substances, molecules and ions between the tooth and its restoration-is an intrinsic problem of direct filling gold, amalgam, resin and cast metal restorations and is clinically undetectable. Microleakage is used as a measure by which clinicians and researchers can predict the performance of the restorative materials in the oral environment. The importance placed on this measure is based on the fact that no available restorative material is perfectly adaptive or adhesive to the tooth [28] .

The most notable factors that contribute to marginal leakage of composites are­

1. Composite resin restorations are very much technique sensitive. Any step that is deviation from the actual procedure leads to failure, including an increase in marginal leakage [1] .

2. Marginal gaps formed at the tooth restoration interface primarily result from dimensional changes like polymerization shrinkage of the setting resin. After the resin has set, masticatory forces, thermal changes and water absorption further affect the size and shape of the gaps [1] .


   Observations & Results Top


a) All composite restorative resins shrink during polymerization. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage usually is in the range of 1.67-5.68%; the lesser being for the light activated ones. In case of bonding agents being used to bind the restorative resin to the tooth structure, shrinkage results in the development of tensile and/or shear stresses at the tooth restoration interface. Within certain limits, the adhesive bond is able to withstand these stresses. Once the stresses exceed the bond strength and elastic deformation of the combined system, a separation at the tooth restoration interface may occur leading to microleakage. It is usually the bond with dentin that is compromised during shrinkage, whereas the bond with enamel is generally strong to withstand the same amount of forces.

b) Functional stress incurred on restorations by cyclic mastication is another factor in inducing micro leakage of resin restorations. Occlusal stresses enhance leakage because of repeated plastic or elastic deformation of the restoration.

c) The marked difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of restorative resins and tooth structure also has a detrimental effect on adhesion. The composites have a higher coefficient of thermal expansion compared to that of the tooth.

Coefficient of thermal expansion of composites

=20-25 x 10 -6 /°C

Coefficient of thermal expansion of enamel

= 11.4 x 10 -6 /°C

Coefficient ofthermal expansion of dentin

= 8.3 x 10 -6 /° C

Combined thermal and occlusal stresses have shown to induce more microleakage as compared to leakage induced by the same stresses individually.

d) Composite resin restorations have a tendency to absorb water from the environment, causing the restoration to expand. Thus the property of water sorption is able to counteract polymerization shrinkage to a little extent. In contrast to the polymerization contraction stresses, which are generated at a rapid rate, relief of stresses by hygroscopic expansion proceeds more slowly. The resins with the largest quantity of filler have the least water sorption (water uptake is the property of the resin component of the matrix). It should be stressed here that though water sorption may improve marginal adaptation of composite resin, it impairs its mechanical properties.

The pathology of cervical lesions of teeth is various and multifactorial. The chemical erosion theory explains how various types of acids decalcify the enamel. Chemical erosions are generally caused by acids from dietary sources, the environment and the stomach. According to Jones (1989) regurgitation can introduce endogenic acids into the mouth and it has been suggested by Bevenius et al (1988) that impaired salivary action may exacerbate the severity of the lesion. Acid erosions show tooth structure loss over a wide area with no sharp line angles while idiopathic cervical erosions are generally wedge shaped and limited to the cervical area of teeth [13] .

A second theory by Bergstrom et al (1988) is based on abrasive wear induced by tooth brushing and dentifrice. In this process the particle size and hardness of the abrasive particles in the toothpaste, the pressure exerted and the frequency of brushing are of primary concern [13] .

A third theory proposed by Lee and Eakle (1984) [13] suggested the possible etiologic factor in cervical erosion is the tensile stress caused by mastication and malocclusion. The local causes play a secondary role in dissolution of the tooth structure to create the lesion. Lateral forces can create tensile stresses that disrupt hydroxyapatite crystals in the enamel, allowing small molecules, such as those of water, to penetrate and render these crystals more susceptible to chemical attack and further deterioration.

Lateral forces create cervical regions of tension and compression, as indicated by the arrows. The magnified section depicts disruption of chemical bonds between enamel rods. Small molecules enter between hydroxyapatite crystals and prevent reestablishment of bonds to make crystals more susceptible to breakage and chemical dissolution.

The first two theories are well documented but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle (1984) [13] remains controversial. According to the latter, a lesion created as a result of tensile stresses should possess certain characteristics:

1 . The lesion should be at or near the cemento­-enamel junction, which is the fulcrum.

2. The region of greatest stress would be a wedge­-shaped area at the fulcrum, which is the typical morphology of cervical erosive lesions.

3. The directions of the lateral force that generates the tensile stress would determine the location of the lesion. For example, if there were two directions of lateral forces that are acting on the same tooth, the created lesion would be a combination of two lesions generated by each of the two forces.

4. The size of the lesion would be directly related to the magnitude and frequency of application of the tensile force.

The morphology of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth (buccal and lingual inclined planes and fossae) is such that most forces generated during functional and parafunctional jaw movements are directed along the long axis of teeth or in a bucco-lingual direction. The presence of adjacent teeth can help to direct forces bucco-lingually. When third molars are missing, second molars do not develop erosions on the distal surfaces because the major forces are directed axially or bucco-lingually; and the adjacent first molar prohibits mesial bending of the tooth, which would be necessary to generate tensile stresses on the distal surface.

The recovery time was reported in the study, in an effort to be as descriptive as we could of our method. The presence of a recovery time, however, would simulate a natural functional occlusal cycle. The teeth are normally engaged in one or the other direction and then separated before the next loading force is applied during mastication.

The recovery time in the study could be controlled by two factors:

1. The space between the contact bumpers on the revolving wheel of the apparatus

2. The speed at which the revolving wheel (with the contact bumpers on it) turned.

Since the wheel had a fixed diameter, the space between the bumpers could not be easily changed. The amount of recovery time was controlled by adjusting the rpm of the wheel itself. It was adjusted until it was felt that there was adequate time for recovery between impacts. This was strictly based on the judgment. There is no evidence that this is the ideal time to replicate the masticatory process accurately. The time between impacts in the mouth would obviously not be this short. However, in the lab this process was speeded up to allow more specimens to be subjected to the fatigue test in a shorter time. Currently, there is some controversy concerning the benefits of utilizing a resin composite restorative material with a low modulus of elasticity for cervical lesions. Some studies have indicated that the use of a material with a low modulus of elasticity will reduce the formation of cervical gaps and marginal leakage. Other studies have indicated that there may be little if any significant difference in the amount of micro leakage in relation to the modulus of elasticity. The present study was designed to specifically investigate the effects of tooth flexure created by lateral cyclic loading on the amount of micro leakage observed in cervical lesions restored with materials of varying rigidity.

Almost all of the specimens from both the control groups and the fatigued groups showed some signs of staining caused by leakage. This may have been the result of contraction shrinkage during curing, which caused the resin to pull away from the cavosurface margin. These restorations were placed in extracted teeth. The manufacturer's suggested instructions for "wet technique" bonding for in vitro testing were followed, but bench top studies usually cannot duplicate the environment on the surface of a vital tooth.

A restorative material with a low modulus of elasticity is usually considered to be more flexible and thus may be able to absorb some of the stress induced by the tooth flexure. This absorption could, theoretically, decrease the amount of micro leakage ordebonding created by tensile forces. The flowable resin composite and a microfilled resin composite material have a much lower modulus of elasticity and ought to be a more flexible material.

Hybrid resin composite and packable resin composite material exhibited significantly more leakage than either the flowable or the microfilled resin composite. This was observed in both the fatigued and the non-fatigued specimens. This finding supports the theory that the lower modulus of elasticity of the flowable or the microfilled resin composites allows more flexure of the restoration during the flexure of the tooth that results from its reciprocal movements. The decreased rigidity of these resin composites may also decrease both the stress created by tooth flexure and the polymerization contraction stress placed on the adhesive bond at the resin-tooth interface.

The statistical analysis also revealed that the amount of microleakage was significantly different among the four groups. The cyclically loaded specimens restored with microfilled and flowable composites did exhibit a lower amount of microleakage than those restored with the hybrid resin composite and packable composite; however the difference was not statistically significant.

The control specimens restored with the flowable resin composite material had less microleakage than did those restored with hybrid resin composite material. This finding supports the possibility that the lower modulus of elasticity of the microfilled and flowable resin composite material may have some beneficial effects in reducing stress placed on the adhesive bond at the resin-tooth interface during polymerization phase.

A study by Condon and Ferracane (2000) [24] suggested that composites with a composition of lower levels of filler particles are less likely to produce high levels of polymerization stress during placement. There has been some discussion that a longer duration of the 'gel' phase during the polymerization of certain resin composites may allow a release of contraction stress [25],[27] . Whether this may be the cause of the difference observed in the polymerization stress, is beyond the scope of the present study.


   Conclusion Top


Within the limitations of the study the following conclusions can be drawn:

1. Among the specimens that were subjected to cyclic fatigue stresses, those restored with packable resin composites and hybrid resin composites exhibited significantly more leakage at the restoration tooth interface than the ones restored with flowable resin composites and microfilled resin composites.

2. Among the specimens that were not subjected to cyclic fatigue stresses, those restored with packable resin composites and hybrid resin composites exhibited significantly more leakage at the restoration tooth interface than did those restored with either flowable resin composites or microfilled resin composites.

The occurrence of microleakage is used to evaluate the success of restorative materials and procedures. While restorative materials and techniques have improved, manipulation of the materials continues to affect the success of the restorations. Microleakage as a yardstick can provide much useful information regarding the performance of the restorative materials and procedures, but as a clinical occurrence it remains a primary source of restorative failure.

[Figure 1],[Figure 2],[Figrue 3],[Figure 4],[Figure 5],[Figure 6],[Figure 7],[Figure 8],[Figure 9],[Figure 10],[Table 1],[Table 2].

 
   References Top

1.Sikri VK. Microleakage In: Textbook of Operative Dentistry. CBS Publishers & Distributors: 2002: 549-569  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Eick JD, Welch FH. Polymerization shrinkage of posterior composite resins and its possible influence on postoperative sensitivity. Quintessence Int 1986- 1 17:103-111.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Lambrechts P, Braem M, Vanherle G. Evaluation of clinical performance for posterior composite resins and dentin adhesives. Oper Dent 1987; 12:53-87.  Back to cited text no. 3  [PUBMED]  
4.Lutz F, Krejci I, Barbakow F. Quality and durability of marginal adaptation in bonded composite restorations. J Dent Res 1992; 71: 1525-1529.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
5.Unterbrink GL, Muesner R. Influence of light intensity on two restorative systems. J Dent 1995;23(3):183-189.  Back to cited text no. 5    
6.Hansen EK. Effect of cavity depth and application technique on marginal adaptation of resins in dentin cavities. J Dent Res 1986; 65:13 19-1321.  Back to cited text no. 6    
7.Tortenson BC, Oden A. Effects of bonding agent types and Incremental techniques on minimizing contraction gaps around resin composites. Dent Mater 1989; 5:218-223  Back to cited text no. 7    
8.Feilzer JA, de Gee AJ, Davidson CL. Quantitative determination of stress reduction by flow in composite restorations. Dent Mater 1990; 6:167-171.  Back to cited text no. 8    
9.Van Meerbeek B, Perdigao J, Gladys S, Lambrechts P, Vanherle G. Enamel and dentin adhesion. In: Schwartz RS, Summit JB, Robbins JW (eds). Fundamentals of Operative Dentistry. A Contemporary Approach. Quintessence, 1996: 149-153.  Back to cited text no. 9    
10.Sluder TB, Bayne SC. Twelve-month study of dentinal adhesives in Class V cervical lesions. J Am DentAssoc 1988; 116: 179-185.  Back to cited text no. 10    
11.Heymann HO, SturdevantJR, Bayne SC, Wilder AD,SluderTB,BrunsonWD. Examining tooth flexure effects on cervical restorations: A two­year clinical study. JAm Dent Assoc 1991; 122: 41-47.  Back to cited text no. 11    
12.Van Meerbeek B, Peumans M, Verschueren M, et al. Clinical status of dentin adhesive systems. J Dent Res 1994; 73: 1690-1702.  Back to cited text no. 12  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
13.Lee WC, Eakle WS. Possible role of tensile stress in the etiology of cervical erosive lesions ofteeth. J Prosthet Dent 1984; 52: 374-380.  Back to cited text no. 13  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
14.Braem M, Lambrechts P, Vanherle G. Stress induced cervical lesions. J Prosthet Dent 1992; 67: 718-722.  Back to cited text no. 14  [PUBMED]  
15.Kuroe T, Itoh H, Caputo AC, Konuma M. Biomechanics of cervical tooth structure lesions and their restorations. Quintessence Int 2000;31:267-274.  Back to cited text no. 15    
16.Goel VK, Khera SC, Ralston JL, Change KH. Stresses at the dentino-enamel junction of human teeth A finite element investigation. J Prosthet Dent 1991; 66:451-459.  Back to cited text no. 16    
17.Kemp Sholte CM, Davidson CL. Marginal scaling of contraction gaps in Class V composite resin restorations. J Dent Res 1988; 67:841-845.  Back to cited text no. 17    
18.Kemp-Sholte CM, Davidson CL. Marginal Integrity related to bond strength and strain capacity of composite resin restorative systems. J Prosthet Dent 1990; 64: 658-664.  Back to cited text no. 18    
19.Willer RD, Collard EW, Duncanson MG Jr. An assessment of marginal microleakage in cervical restorations with gingival margins in dentin. Okla Dent Assoc J 1986; 77 (Fall): 31-36.  Back to cited text no. 19    
20.Bayne SC, Heymann HO, SturdevantJR, Wilder AD, Sluder TB. Contributing co- variables on clinical trials.AmJ Dent 1991;4:247-250.  Back to cited text no. 20    
21.Campanella LC, Meiers JC. Microleakage of composites and compomers in Class V restorations. Am J Dent 1999; 12: 185-189.  Back to cited text no. 21  [PUBMED]  
22.Lutz F, Krejei I, Oldenburg TR. Elimination of polymerization stresses at the margins of posterior composite resin restorations: A new restorative technique. Quintessence Int 1986; 17:777-784.  Back to cited text no. 22    
23.Tjan AHL, Bergh BH, Lidner C. Effect of various incremental techniques on marginal adaptation of Class II composite resin restorations. J Prosthet Dent 1992; 67: 62-66.  Back to cited text no. 23    
24.Condon JR, Ferracane JL.Assessing the effect of composite formulation on polymerization stress. JAm DentAssoc 2000; 131: 497-503.  Back to cited text no. 24    
25.Kanca J, Suh BI. Pulse activation: Reducing resin based composite contraction stresses at the enamel cavosurface margins. Am J Dent 1999; 12: 107-112.  Back to cited text no. 25    
26.Fruits TJ, Van Brunt CL, Khajotia SS, Duncanson MG. Effect of cyclical lateral forces on microleakage in cervical resin composite restorations. Quintessence Int 2002;33:205-212.  Back to cited text no. 26    
27.Versluis A, Tantbirojn D, Douglas WH. Do dental composites shrink towards light? J Dent Res 1998; 77: 1435-1445.  Back to cited text no. 27  [PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]
28.Bauer JG, Henson JL. Microleakage: A Measure of the performance of Direct Filling Materials. Oper Dent 1984;9:2-9.  Back to cited text no. 28  [PUBMED]  

Top
Correspondence Address:
Ryan Francisco Alberto
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Goa Dental College & Hospital, Bambolim, Goa 403202
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-0707.42274

Rights and Permissions


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figrue 3], [Figure 4], [Figure 5], [Figure 6], [Figure 7], [Figure 8], [Figure 9], [Figure 10]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
 
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  
 


    Abstract
    Materials and Me...
    Examination
    Discussions
    Observations & R...
    Conclusion
    Introduction
    References
    Article Figures
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1801    
    Printed166    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal